359th Fighter Group

I manage the 359th Fighter Group’s Facebook page, sharing stories and photos about the men who served with the Group. The page currently sees about 4,400 visitors a week and is growing.  Hope you’ll stop by!

 

Tales final working version Feb 17 frontTales from the 359th Fighter Group:  In December 1943 the newly formed 359th Fighter Group flew its first mission in the European Theater of Operations. Twenty-two months later World War II ended, and in November 1945 the 359th was inactivated, with 346 combat missions and 13,455 sorties to its credit. This collection of mission and POW reports, bar stories,  and post-war reflections provides a first-hand account of life on base, in the air, and going on leave in war-time England, as recounted by the 359th’s pilots, officers, and enlisted men.

 

 

 

 

Manifest front cover A Manifest Spirit is a tribute to the officers that gave the 359th Fighter Group its organization and direction, the enlisted men who made it work, and above all the pilots, 121 of whom made the ultimate sacrifice in the pursuit of freedom during WWII.

Relying not on recollections rendered imprecise by the passage of time, or secondhand reports which inevitably lose context, A Manifest Spirit instead presents observations from the group historian, base chaplain, and the fighter pilots themselves, recorded as they occurred during the conflict.

 

 

 

Fogg in the Cockpit

Fogg in the Cockpit:  Prior to his distinguished career that saw him referred to as the dean of American railroad artists, Captain Howard Fogg kept a diary during his World War II combat tour in England. He flew 76 missions with the 359th Fighter Group in both bomber escort and ground attack roles.

From his backstage encounter in a London theater with Lawrence Olivier and Vivien Leigh, to the pre-dawn chaplain’s benediction on June 6, 1944, to a mission escorting B-17s flying down a valley in the snow capped French Alps as they dropped supplies to French freedom fighters, Fogg in the Cockpit offers a first hand look at Howard’s fascinating and often unexpected story.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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